Pop-Up Templates

I made templates for each of the four scenes I created. I printed them off and cut & glued the pieces together by hand. The front and back cover was also created by hand. It takes a day to make one of the books!

This is the marker for the Doctor Panda first aid instruction video:

Once I publish my Junaio App, everyone will be able to print off this marker and scan the image with their device and watch the augmented reality I created ūüôā

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Character Beauty Shots

I rendered some beauty shots of my main origami characters and origami cube characters from 3D Studio Max:

Exhibition Show

The exhibition was a great success and really fun! The show was held on the 14th June in the London Street Gallery in Derry/Londonderry. It will also be running from Monday 17th to Thursday 20th with free admission. (10am to 4pm) Come check it out!

Here’s a link to the London Street Gallery: http://www.londonstreetgallery.org/off-the-cuff.html

Here are some of the pictures I took of the exhibition:

 

Some close-ups of my origami pop-up book:

 

I covered a whole sofa with my stuff whilst getting my exhibition ready:

Expeimenting Pop-Up Scene Size

I first made the pop-up scene with an A4 sheet, next I tried out an A3 sheet and also an A2 sheet, here are the results:

A3 Sheet РBrighter colour 

I also made the colours brighter to see how it would turn out. I like the ‘pop’ it gives, makes it more appealing to children.

 

 

A2 Sheet

 

 

 

Building My Pop-Up Scene

I printed out my template, cut the shapes out and stuck them in the right places. Before I finalised my template, this is how my pop-up scene was turning out:

I really am happy of how it was coming along. I added in some origami animals and leaves to give it more ‘pop’ with the bright colours. This scene was created using an A4¬†sheet. The size is a quarter of a full circle on an A4 sheet.

Feedback

I showed my supervisor this experiment and they liked it, but he thought it would be better to make the colours brighter and consider¬†actual size I plan on having this pop-up book to be. Another supervisor told me that he thought there was too much colour and he would prefer about only 2/3 colours with different shades of it. He also suggested contrasting the floor and the background and also the pop-up pieces to distinguish them. However, as this piece is aimed towards children I really wanted to add lot’s of colours to appeal to them and it is my style. I plan on making the colours brighter to make it ‘pop’.

My supervisor was also suggesting using heavier paper weights to experiment on the strength and making the fold in flap in the middle stay down, as when you open this piece up, the middle part stays up slightly. What I could do is stick something on the bottom of the piece to keep it down, or at the end of year show I could have the 4 sections stuck down in place with another pop-up book on the side for people to pick up and open up for themselves.

Printing

I need to look for a printing company¬†that prints the best quality and uses a heavy paper weight. I printed A3 sheets with my template and the quality wasn’t that great.

Cutting

My main piece is circular and it’s too difficult to cut the shape perfectly so I will need a circle protractor or something similar to cut the perfect shape. The other parts I will be using scissors/Stanly knife, but I need a method that will cut them perfectly.

Origami and Acetate Quick Experiment

I cut a a¬†small circle from an acetate sheet and made origami leaves and roses. I’ve included pictures of the origami instructions I used to make the leaves (Sorry about the quality!):

leaf instructions

Taken from ‘Origami Fold-A-Day Calender 2013’

 leaf instruction

leaf instruction 2

leaf instruction 3

Taken from ‘The Simple Art of Japanese Papercrafts’

Origami Flat Rose

Taken from Google Images

Quick Experiment

I stuck the dark green leaves on the acetate using Anita’s glue and then cut a smaller circle piece from the acetate and glued on the smaller light green leaves. The roses were glued on afterwards. After the glued dried, you could barely see the glue marks. I don’t like how it turned out, so I decided to try again and make it similar to the vector trees that inspired me.

Origami Leaves and roses

Better Result

Origami Leaves and Tree

This is more like how I wanted the trees to look, breathing room for the leaves and color co-ordination. I like how it turned out even without adding layers, but I still need to nail my style for my project!

Acetate Progress

Cutting the Acetate

I started cutting out my tree/leaves from the acetate sheet using scissors and it work well as the sheet is only 0.1mm in thickness. For the final pieces for my project I think I’ll use a Stanly¬†knife for precision, but for now I’m just quickly experimenting.

Clear Plastic Packaging

I think you can get thicker acetate sheets, but this is the thickest the shop had them in. My supervisor also suggested possibly using the clear plastic that is usually used to package toys/boxes and they would be much thicker.

Clear Plastic Packaging

The acetate sheets I have at the moment seem to be strong enough to not flop over when I hold them from the bottom corner. As for the tree trunk, I think I will have to use thick card to support the weight of the acetate.

Shape of the images

I was planning on cutting round the images into a circle, but it didn’t look right and quite bulky, especially when I tried layering the pieces on top of each other. I decided to cut round the leaves roughly to get rid of the extra unnecessary acetate. It worked out much better.

Layering the images & Gluing

I messed about with the pieces to work out which leaves worked best together when layered on top of each other. When I was satisfied it was time to glue them together. But what should I use to glue them because the acetate is clear, so you would be able to see the glue as well.

Note: Gluing on the rough side of the acetate sheet works better as the glue has grip.

Acetate Layers, Cut and Glue

Top Left – I plan on using this piece for sticking on origami flowers and leaves and see if it works well.

Top Right – this is a single layer of acetate, I wanted to see if the image would work well with just one layer, but after testing the layering, I found it more interesting and more dynamic.

Bottom left – First I tried using the 3D transparent Dots I bought yesterday and they are clear, however, you can see it as if it were squishy glue. But the glue dot works really well, it sticks the two pieces of acetate together instantly.

Bottom Right¬†– Next I tried using ‘Anita’s Tacky Glue’ which dries colourless, but you have to wait about 30 minutes for a little dap of the glue to dry colourless. Make sure you leave it alone as it dries or the acetate will shift and the glue will spread.

Anita's Tacky Glue

Solution

I think I will cover up the glue mark with part of the tree trunk/branch or even origami leaves/flowers. I don’t think you can get glue which is clearer than acetate so I plan on covering up the glue.

Acetate Printing

My supervisor suggested using acetate to make some of my trees and I thought I could stick my origami leaves and flowers on them to make them look like they are floating, inspiration came from these vector trees:

Vector Tree

I’ll be giving this a go tonight!

Acetate

Acetate

Acetate paper allows you to print transparency films to use on over head projectors, report covers for school or work projects or craft projects.

Things you need:

  1. Word processor or design software
  2. Inkjet or laser printer
  3. Acetate paper sheets

 

  1. Lay out the design to print on the acetate paper in your word processor or other design program.
  2. Load the acetate paper into your printer. Make sure to remove any tissue separator sheets that may be placed between the pieces of acetate paper before loading into the printer. Load the acetate paper so that the rough side of the sheet is the side that will be printed on. Consult with your printer documentation or print a test sheet to be sure of proper placement in the printer.
  3. Select “Print” from the “File” menu on the toolbar of your software program. Within the print dialogue box, choose “Properties” to explore the options available on your printer. Many printers have a “Transparency” option available. Consult your printer documentation for more information about your printer’s capabilities. Additional printing information can be found on the instructions that came with your package of acetate paper. After the appropriate settings have been determined in your printer properties, select “Print” to continue printing the file. For multiple page documents, print pages one at a time to prevent possible smudging.
  4. Handle the acetate paper carefully once your image has been printed. Hold it on the edges of the sheet to prevent possible smearing before the ink has been allowed to dry. Leave in the printer tray, or lay on a flat surface to allow the sheet to dry completely before handling. This could take up to 10 minutes.
  5. Repeat the process for any additional pages that may need to be printed. Allow all pages to dry completely before stacking.

Helpful Tips

Using acetate can be tricky if you haven’t done so before, here is some helpful tips if you ever want to try it out:

  • You must ensure you are using INKJET acetate – you can tell if your acetate is inkjet friendly by checking to see if it has one rough side and one glossy side – you must make sure you print on the ROUGH side. Normal printer settings are a good place to start.
  • Acetate can have paper feed problems¬†– these sometimes (depending on the printer) can be caused because the acetate in particular being ejecting each time because some printers cannot detect the start of the acetate because it is transparent – to combat both these problems the following method should help – If the printer is struggling with feeding the acetate in – then use a piece of normal paper and attach this to the acetate down one of the short edges with double-sided tape – then ensure this end feeds into the printer first – basically the paper will act as a carrier sheet.
  • To test the correct loading of your acetate paper, first load a plain sheet of paper into the printer. Use a pen to mark on the side of the paper visible to you once it has been loaded into the printer and print as normal. Note the placement of the mark you made on the printed sheet to determine which side of the page has been printed on.

Origami Folded Characters

I finally got my origami characters uploaded! I managed to fold them how I drew them and seen them in my head. I used these as guides as I was modelling the characters in 3D Studio Max. The creases will also work as guides when I start texturing the little cubes.

Here are more views of the little cube characters:

The Chick’s fluff on the top of its head was difficult to fold so I have made it close to how I have designed the character as possible. Below is my first attempt, you can see that the fluff was starting on the sides of the head rather than just the middle.

I made an extra character, which is just a plain origami cube, who will be the little characters acting out the 10 second scenario scene in which one has an accident.

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